Fr. Jeff Putthoff, SJ and Fr. Greg Boyle, SJ

Date: Tuesday, November 14
7:30 PM

Presenting: "The Work of hope: A conversation on breaking the cycle of trauma and violence with youth"

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2017 AT 12:00 PM

 

Join Fr. Boyle and Fr. Putthoff in conversation as they share their experiences and wisdom gained from decades of ministry to young people in Los Angeles, CA and Camden, NJ. This event will offer the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a deeper insight into the unconditional love of Christ, lived and explored by Fr. Boyle and Fr. Putthoff, as they have worked to heal and transform communities struggling with poverty and despair.
  • Learn about the importance and practical necessity of bring hope to young people suffering from poverty and violence.
  • Explore the practical ways that people of faith can bring hope and healing to communities in need, especially to young people.
  • Get inspired with new ideas and insights for yourself and your parish’s social outreach to our local communities in need.

Biography

Fr. Greg Boyle, SJ

The Rev. Gregory J. Boyle, S.J., is the founder and executive director of Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles, the largest gang intervention, rehabilitation and re-entry program in the world.  A native Angeleno, Father Boyle entered the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) in 1972 and was ordained a Catholic priest in 1984. 

 In 1986, he was appointed pastor of Dolores Mission Church in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of East LA.  At the time, Dolores Mission was the poorest Catholic parish in the city, located between two large public housing projects with the highest concentration of gang activity in Los Angeles. He witnessed the devastating impact of gang violence on his community during what he has called "the decade of death" that began in the late 1980's. In the face of law enforcement and criminal justice tactics and policies of suppression and mass incarceration as the means to end gang violence, Father Boyle and parish and community members adopted what was a radical approach at the time: treating gang members as human beings. “Gang violence is about a lethal absence of hope,” Father Boyle has said.  “Nobody has ever met a hopeful kid who joined a gang.” 

In the wake of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, Jobs for a Future and Proyecto Pastoral, a community-organizing project begun at Dolores Mission, launched their first social enterprise business in an abandoned bakery that Hollywood producer Ray Stark helped them purchase.  They called it Homeboy Bakery.  Today, Homeboy Industries employs and trains former gang members in a range of social enterprises, as well as provides critical services to 15,000 men and women who walk through its doors every year seeking a better life.

Father Boyle is the author of the New York Times-bestseller Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion, which was named one of the Best Books of 2010 by Publishers Weekly and received the PEN Center USA 2011 Creative Nonfiction Award. 

Father Boyle is the subject of Academy Award winner Freida Lee Mock’s 2012 documentary, G-Dog.  He has received the California Peace Prize and been inducted into the California Hall of Fame.  In 2014, the White House named Father Boyle a Champion of Change.  He received the 2016 Humanitarian of the Year Award from the James Beard Foundation, the national culinary-arts organization.

Media links: 

Fr. Jeff Putthoff, SJ

Father Putthoff currently serves as the President of St. John’s Jesuit High School and Academy in Toledo, OH. He spent 16 years building Hopeworks ‘N Camden in Camden, N.J., an organization that uses trauma informed care to train youth, ages 14-23, in website design, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and Salesforce technology. As the founder and executive director of the organization, Fr. Putthoff cultivated the relationships and created the framework for the organization that included three social enterprises. Hopeworks has worked with over 3,000 youth in one of the poorest and most underserved communities in America to transform their lives. Hopeworks youth have gained real-world work experience through using their technical training and skills with over 450 business clients. Many of the youth have gone on to earn their GED, attain internships and attend and complete college, and find rewarding jobs.

In addition to building an innovative and effective non-profit organization for youth, Fr. Putthoff has also served as an Ignatian Retreat Director in Philadelphia, Pa., an associate pastor at Holy Name Parish in Camden, N.J., and a high school teacher at St. Louis University High School in St. Louis, Mo. 

He has a Bachelor of Philosophy from St. Louis University and four master’s degrees: a Master in Organizational Dynamics from the University of Pennsylvania; a Master of Theology from Weston School of Theology; a Master of Divinity, also from Weston School of Theology; and a Master of English from Loyola University Chicago.